people power

 

People Power Anniversary is a nationwide observance and school holiday in the Philippines each year. This event holds a special place in the hearts of many Filipinos as they remember a revolution that restored democracy in the Philippines in 1986.

Many people celebrate People Power Anniversary by wearing yellow, which was the official color of the LABAN party, the rival political group that challenged the government back in 1986. Much of the festivities and activities occur in the city of Manila, particularly Epifanio Delos Santos Avenue (EDSA), a major public road where people flock to visit. Activities include programs such as church masses and concerts.
Many people also flash the LABAN (fight) sign, which is an “L” sign using one’s index finger and thumb. Media stations broadcast programs about the event through a live feed of street celebrations, documentaries about the revolution, and interviews with prominent political figures and personalities. The print media publish news and feature articles on stories related to this event.

The story behind People Power Anniversary traces back to events that occurred from February 22 to 25, 1986. Masses of disillusioned people, mainly from urban Manila, staged a revolution on the streets of Manila. This revolution eventually led to the downfall of a government that many people saw as corrupt and oppressive.
A major road called EDSA, in Manila, was the stage for crucial events that occurred during the revolution. Nearly two million people were protesting on this street at one point during this historical event. Many Filipinos consider the holiday as historic and important because the revolution changed and reformed the political system in the Philippines.
People Power Anniversary was a working holiday on February 25 in previous years. It was not a day off for work or schools but activities and ceremonies to celebrate the anniversary would continue to occur. In 2009 the Monday nearest February 25 was declared a special holiday for all schools (both public and private).

 

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